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For Immediate Release                                Press Contact: Sarah Carr | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | (401) 769-9675

What: Tape Artist Installation at the Museum of Work & Culture

 

When: August 7-11

 

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket

 

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Tape Artists to Spend Week at Museum of Work & Culture

 

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture will be the canvas for a temporary art installation by Riverzedge Arts and The Tape Art Crew, a group of public artists who create large scale murals with colored tape.

 

On Monday, August 7, the teen artists will work with young people on the autism spectrum as part of the Museum’s Made-to-Order Monday program. Together, they will create a temporary exhibit on the walls and floors of the changing gallery space.

 

On August 7 and 8, Riverzedge will complete the installation of the exterior mural, which will be on display August 9 and 10 before being removed in a community event on August 11.

 

Michael Townsend and Leah Smith of The Tape Art Crew have served as mentors for students from Riverzedge Arts as they design, create, and install their work at the MoWC.

 

Riverzedge’s Tape Art project is made possible through an National Endowment for the Arts Art Work Award that is supporting a one-year “Artist in Experience” project in the Public Art Lab. The Artist in Experience project enables the teen artists in the Public Art Lab to commission three public art mentors to work collaboratively with them to design, fabricate, and install public art and sculpture in the city of Woonsocket. The Art Works category supports the creation of work and presentation of both new and existing work, lifelong learning in the arts, and public engagement with the arts through 13 disciplines or fields.

 

“The arts are part of our everyday lives – no matter who you are or where you live – they have the power to transform individuals, spark economic vibrancy in communities, and transcend the boundaries across diverse sectors of society,” NEA Chairman Jane Chu said. “Supporting projects like the one from Riverzedge offers more opportunities to engage in the arts every day.”

 

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

 

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.

 

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