North Kingstown man convicted of 3D printing ghost guns

 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Attorney General Peter F. Neronha announced that a North Kingstown man was convicted in Washington County Superior Court of multiple counts of manufacturing ghost guns following an investigation by the North Kingstown Police Department that began in May 2021.

 

Nicholas Dailey (age 30) entered a plea of nolo contendere to two counts of manufacture and possession of a ghost gun, produced by a 3D printing process.

 

At a hearing on July 21, 2022, before Superior Court Justice Melanie Wilk Thunberg, the Court sentenced the defendant to four years, with one year to serve at the Adult Correctional Institution and a three-year suspended sentence.

 

“Since ghost guns were banned in Rhode Island in mid-2020, our office has prosecuted nearly 50 cases where these untraceable firearms are being found in the hands of individuals involved in criminal activity,” said Attorney General Neronha. “Ghost guns are fully operable firearms without serial numbers that thus cannot be traced by law enforcement after they are used in criminal activity. They are sought after by individuals who value them for that very reason, and/or cannot pass a background check.  They can be made with parts ordered on the internet, or as the case here, from a 3D printer in a person’s living room.  There is no question that they are the gun of choice for many Rhode Island criminals, and present a clear threat to public safety. I am grateful to the North Kingstown and Warwick Police Departments for their excellent work during the investigation. Their outstanding efforts led to the seizure of several ghost guns and prevented the completion of additional ones.”

 

Had this case proceeded to trial, the State was prepared to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that in 2021, the defendant manufactured several ghost guns and several pistol frames using a 3D printer at a home in North Kingstown.

 

On May 4, 2021, officers from the Warwick Police Department, acting on a tip that the defendant was in possession of ghost guns, conducted a traffic stop of the defendant’s vehicle where they located two loaded 17-round 9mm pistol magazines along with several spent 9mm shell casings. Officers noticed that the magazines did not have manufacturers markings on them and the material they were made from displayed a pattern of parallel lines consistent with markings of items printed with a 3D printer.

 

During the traffic stop, the defendant admitted to officers that he possessed two 3D printed handguns at his home in North Kingstown. Officers notified the North Kingstown Police department of the suspected ghost guns.

 

Detectives later responded to the defendant’s home, and after gaining consent to search, seized two complete 3D printed ghost gun copies of a 9mm Glock 17 semi-automatic handgun. Detectives also seized three defective 3D printed Glock 17 frames, a 3D printer, a laptop, and a box of 9mm ammunition.

 

The defendant later admitted to 3D printing copies of Glock 17 frames and magazines based on plans that he had downloaded from the internet. He also admitted to ordering gun parts that he used to complete the ghost guns.

 

The two ghost guns were successfully test fired at the Rhode Island State Crime Laboratory and deemed to be operable.

 

Detectives Gregory Miga and Michael Bernardo of the North Kingstown Police Department and Assistant Attorney General Mark Trovato of the Office of the Attorney General conducted the investigation and prosecution of the case, with the assistance of the Warwick Police Department.

 

South Carolina Senator Tim Scott says thousands are without power across the state as Ian makes landfall. Now a post-tropical cyclone, Ian landed as a hurricane in South Carolina earlier today and is moving up the East Coast. Scott says around 200-thousand people are without power, and that now is not the time to ease up worries.        The White House says the federal response to Hurricane Ian is not about politics. White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre [[ kar-EENE jhan-pea-AIR ]] declined to offer an opinion about whether Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is doing a good job in his storm-ravaged state. Jean-Pierre noted DeSantis and President Biden have had several productive phone conversations.        Former President Trump is scheduled to be deposed next month in a defamation lawsuit. A woman named E. Jean Carroll has accused Trump of sexually assaulting her in the 1990s, and says she plans to file a separate civil suit against Trump on top of the defamation suit. The former President has denied Carroll's allegation that he assaulted her.       The CDC says it has "moderate" confidence the rate of monkeypox cases in the U.S. will either decline or plateau within the next two weeks. In its latest report on the outbreak, the CDC said cases could either decline or plateau, or begin rising "slowly" or "rapidly" with exponential growth.        A high-profile trial stemming from last year's Capitol riot is expected to begin soon. Yahoo News reports jury selection has ended in the trial of Stewart Rhodes, who is charged with seditious conspiracy for his role in the attack. Rhodes is the leader of the Oath Keepers militia group who authorities say helped plan the riot and called for civil war. He's one of five defendants in the trial that'll start next week.       Cleveland Browns star Myles Garrett says his recent car crash was a serious wake up call. The defensive end was going 20 miles over the speed limit when he crashed his car on Monday. Thankfully, both he and his passenger escaped relatively unscathed, with Garrett suffering a minor shoulder and bicep sprain.